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Social Security Expert Faye Sykes on the Air with Radio Host Dana Barrett

Faye Sykes, CEO of Social Security Benefit Planners joined us in studio during hour one of today’s show! Faye explained the right time to take social security and how she and her company is able to help families maximize their social security benefits.

During hour two, Jackie Cannizzo, Executive Director of JCI Foundation joined us to dish on two upcoming events you don’t want to miss! The JCI Foundation will host the Judson Women’s Leadership Conference on June 20th at the Cobb Galleria; a great opportunity for women to learn and be inspired by successful leaders from all walks of life.

The Birth of Social Security in America

How do I collect Social Security?

We take Social Security for granted, but where did this important insurance program come from and when did it start? It hasn’t been around forever, has it? The answer is no. Social Security began after the Great Depression, when millions of Americans who had lost their savings were facing an old age defined by stark poverty. Few workers had pensions through their jobs, and President Franklin Roosevelt wanted to do something to alleviate the poverty that faced so many older workers in their retirement years.

Since its creation in 1935, millions of retirees have been able to live more comfortably because of this national insurance program, which they collectively funded through payroll taxes during their working years you will see this as FICA on your payroll statement. Though Social Security wasn’t meant to be the only source of income for beneficiaries, it was in its early years and, unfortunately, it still is today for many. As per Social Security fact sheet in 2017 21% of married couples and 43% of unmarried persons rely on Social Security for 90% or more of their income. Many people do not realize that this is a program that has a life insurance, disability and retirement income benefits that you and your family can benefit from.

With changing demographics that include more retirees and fewer workers, Social Security has had to evolve over the years. President Reagan signed into law several revisions to Social Security after Congress passed suggestions made by the Greenspan Commission, which had reviewed the program’s financial picture. These changes included an increase in the payroll tax that pays for benefits as well as a gradual increase in the retirement age, from 65 to 67.

In the future, it’s likely that more changes will have to be made to keep the program financially sound. The prospect can sound alarming, but making necessary tweaks to keep a valuable program that provides millions of Americans with the basic income they need is well worth the effort. Long live Social Security!

For a full customized projection of your Social Security income please sign up for a plan option or learn more at www.socialsecuritybp.com.

Not associated with or endorsed by the Social Security Administration or any other government agency.

Broke as a Joke? Social Security’s Finances

What is the future of Social Security?

Is Social Security broke? Reading the news can sometimes leave you with the impression that Social Security is practically out of money. This massive program provides key income and takes in millions of dollars each year, but is it going belly-up?

Here’s how it works. The payroll taxes that you and everyone else pay each month (FICA and Medicare) go to the treasury, where they are counted as credits to the Social Security Trust Fund. Those who receive Social Security benefits get their money from what’s paid in, but there is some left over. The excess is invested in special issue U.S. Treasury bonds, which earn interest. The interest is credited to the trust fund, as well.

Right now, more money comes into the program through taxes and interest than goes out in benefit payments. Years of this excess pay-in has created a surplus that amounted to $2.7 trillion by 2014’s close. That figure will continue to increase until 2019, when the surplus is expected to reach $2.8 trillion.

But as the Baby Boomers retire and smaller birth cohorts begin to fill the ranks of the workers whose taxes fund Social Security, there will be more money going out in the form of benefits than there is coming in through payroll withholding taxes. At that point, the treasury bonds that the Social Security Trust Fund owns will be needed to help cover the benefits that beneficiaries receive.

The program is expected to fully utilize its surplus in 2034, which will leave payroll taxes as the only source with which to make benefit payments. According to current projections, those taxes will cover approximately 79% of the anticipated amount needed. Congress will have to decide whether to cut benefits or increase funding, which they could easily do by raising the limit on the amount of income to which FICA and Medicare taxes apply.

Social Security isn’t exactly going broke, but it will need to be tweaked in order to provide the benefits that today’s workers have been promised when they retire. Do you have an opinion on how to handle the future shortfall in the program’s budget? Let your senators and representatives know!

To receive your own customized Social Security benefit projections please visit our website www.socialsecuritybp.com to learn more or sign up for a plan.

Not associated with or endorsed by the Social Security Administration or any other government agency.

Social Security Is a Lifesaver for Many Women

How do Women collect Social Security?

Social Security a Women Lifesaver

Social Security is a retirement, disability and life insurance program and if you’re a Woman, this can be a lifesaver in retirement. It’s not that women are more interested in a financially secure old age than men. Americans of both sexes rely on Social Security for critical support in their retirement years, but for a variety of reasons, it’s often women who depend on it the most.

  • Longer lives – Women, on average, live longer than men. Without sufficient private retirement savings, this longevity can result in Social Security being the sole or majority source of income. The potential of running out of retirement savings is a problem that affects many retirees, but because of their longer life expectancy, more women end up counting on Social Security alone to support them.
  • Smaller paychecks – Sadly women on average don’t earn as much as men. They often work in fields that are lower-paid than those where men predominate, and even in the same job women frequently earn less than a man does in the same position. Fair? Maybe not, but it’s a fact. That makes it harder to save for retirement and reduces pension benefits, where they exist. As a result, Social Security often forms a greater part of women’s retirement income than men’s.
  • Fewer working years – Between raising children and caring for aging parents, women often take years out of their careers that men do not. While some men do choose to stay home with children or serve as caregivers for parents, it is far more likely that a woman will do so, statistically speaking. Since the formula that determines Social Security benefits is biased toward lower-earning workers, women get some protection from the hit they would otherwise take from a shorter work history.
  • Less other retirement income – Men are more likely than women to have pensions through their jobs, and to have larger pensions than the women who do qualify (partly because of women’s shorter work histories and lower wages). Without this additional income in retirement, women tend to be more dependent on the benefits they receive from Social Security than men are.

Social Security shouldn’t be your only plan for retirement income, but whether or not it is supplemented by private savings, if you’re a woman, it’s a critical component. Having a plan with your spouse before taking benefits can make a huge difference in how much money is available in retirement. Sign up today to have your own customized Social Security plan www.socialsecuritybp.com or info@socialsecuritybp.com.

Not associated with or endorsed by the Social Security Administration or any other government agency.

Social Security Expert Faye Sykes on the Air with Radio Host Eric Holtzclaw

Planning today for tomorrow. Social Security expert Faye Sykes, NSSA, CLTC, National Social Security Advisor and CEO of Social Security Benefit Planners joined radio show host Eric V. Holtzclaw on Build Your Best Business to highlight steps all entrepreneurs can take to protect their retirement income.

Faye shares what inspired her to enter into this niche market and add on to her current services to help both new and existing clients and expand her business. LISTEN NOW!

 

 

Social Security Expert Faye Sykes on the Air with Ryan Poterack

Planning today for tomorrow. Social Security expert Faye Sykes, NSSA, CLTC, National Social Security Advisor and CEO of Social Security Benefit Planners joined radio show host Ryan Poterack with expert advice on Social Security planning. LISTEN NOW!

Not associated with or endorsed by the Social Security Administration or any other government agency.

Are You Part of the Sandwich Generation?

Many Americans today are part of what is known as the sandwich generation. No, that doesn’t mean covered in peanut butter or surrounded by lettuce and tomatoes. It refers to being economically sandwiched by two other generations, one older and one younger, that rely on you for financial support.

Providing emotional support for parents and children is part and parcel of being human. It’s both demanding and rewarding, but also creates some fear for the future. Providing financial support for these loved ones while taking care of yourself and your own future, however, can be tough. For many, it seems like an inescapable burden, and fulfilling it can leave you unable to provide sufficient resources to meet your own needs.

If you’re still funding your adult kids’ lifestyles and struggling to take good care of your parents’ financial needs at the same time, you might want to consider whether it’s the best strategy. Despite the desire to provide everything you can for your family, this financial sandwich can leave you in a bad situation a few years down the road.

  • Your kids have their whole life to pay back college and other debts. It feels good to provide your children with a debt-free college education and help with a car, house or other steps toward the good life. But can you afford it? Ignoring your financial future so you can give them the best start isn’t in anyone’s best interest. If you can’t support yourself in retirement, they’ll feel duty-bound to help. It’s often better to let them take out loans to accomplish their goals, while you save for your retirement years. That leaves you better prepared to take care of your own future needs while helping them realize the true costs of their choices and value them appropriately.
  • Learn from your parents and save more toward retirement. The financial sandwich you’re in now should illustrate the importance of saving for retirement. It’s more expensive than most people expect, between rising healthcare costs, inflation and longer lifespans. You’re seeing that first-hand with your parents; learn the lessons that their predicament illustrates and get serious about saving now, so you won’t be in the same one later.
  • You cannot take out loans for retirement. While it’s relatively easy to get a loan for a college education, house or car, just try asking for one to pay for retirement expenses. Lenders will laugh at you! Once you’re past working age, it’s virtually impossible to get a loan unless you can prove you have the resources to pay it back. That’s not a situation that inspires confidence for older Americans who need extra income just to get by, so let the kids get a loan now. It’s far easier to obtain and pay back than the one you’ll need if you don’t save enough for your retirement.

What’s the takeaway? Giving your retirement savings short shrift so you can keep paying for the generational sandwich isn’t wise. If you don’t have enough saved, it’s helpful to do what you can to maximize your Social Security income. But in the big picture, it’s probably more important to save for your own retirement than to fully fund your children’s college and post-college years.

Not associated with or endorsed by the Social Security Administration or any other government agency.