Social Security Benefits for Children

Social Security for Children

You would be surprised to know that according to the Social Security Administration, there are approximately 4.4 million children who receive $2.5 billion in aid each month.

Children of disabled, retired or deceased parents may receive Social Security benefits, which are intended to help families provide for their children through high school. When a parent dies or becomes disabled, Social Security is given to help the family meet the financial needs of the family. The law also protects unmarried and dependent grandchildren who were being cared for by the deceased, disabled, or elderly.

What children qualify for Social Security? It makes no difference whether your child is adopted, biological, or dependent step children, they maybe eligible if they meet certain requirements.

  • Has a parent(s) who is disabled or retired and eligible for Social Security benefits.
  • Is unmarried.
  • Is younger than 18 years old or up to age 19 if he or she is a full time high school student.
  • Is 18 years or older and disabled (as long as the disability began before the individual turned age 22).

 

How to Receive Benefits

First, the family must present the child’s birth certificate, the parents’ Social Security number and the child’s Social Security number. There may be additional documents required as well. Depending upon the circumstances, the applicant must provide a parent’s death certificate and/or evidence of disability from a doctor.

If your child is disabled, the Social Security Administration has a fact sheet and starter packet to help you navigate the process of receiving benefits. This information will guide you along the path to sign up for and obtain benefits and includes a frequently asked questions section as well.

If you are taking care of a child and are receiving benefits, then his or her benefits may stop at a different time than your own. For example, if the child is not disabled, then the caretaker’s benefits will terminate when the child turns 16 years old. If the child is disabled and you have responsibility and control of the child, then your benefits may continue. For these types of specific circumstances, it’s best to contact the Social Security Administration.

The Social Security benefit for children is an important government tool to help keep families — especially the youngest of the bunch — solvent during times of death and disability. Be sure to check in with the Social Security Benefit Planners in evaluating your own case.

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